Apple fruit sweeteners are not addictive, according to research

Apple fruit, the world’s most popular fruit, is no longer considered a treat to consume or overdose on.

Researchers say the findings from a large study of about 1.3 million people who regularly ate at least one serving a day for the last 20 years are not evidence of addiction.

The findings, which were published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, suggest that the popular, natural sweetener does not produce a similar type of dependence on sweeteners, such as those found in other fruits and vegetables.

The study also found that most people who had eaten a daily serving of fruit for 20 years or more had lower levels of craving, depression and anxiety than those who had never eaten the fruit.

The new research adds to the body of research showing that the sugar-rich fruits and veggies that are commonly eaten by Americans are less addictive than many people have been led to believe.

Researchers also found little evidence that a daily dose of the popular sweetener is linked to higher rates of depression, substance abuse or obesity.

Apple products are the top-selling fruit and vegetable in the United States.

The fruit, which is rich in vitamin C, contains about half as much calories per serving as other fruits.

But they are also highly addictive and can cause headaches, stomach cramps and diarrhea.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the average American consumes more than two cups of fruits and nuts per day, or nearly seven pounds.

They also eat about 25 percent more calories than their Western counterparts, a study last year found.